press release

VAN HORN SHOWS ULRIKE SCHULZE. SPECTRE

04.09.2020 - 24.10.2020

DC OPEN
4 SEP. 11 AM - 10 PM
5 SEP. 11 AM - 8 PM
6 SEP. 11 AM - 6 PM

We are very happy to show Ulrike Schulze's second solo-exhibition at the gallery.

DECONSTRUCTED CATCHMENT AREAS

"Ulrike Schulze's objects are not figurative, and this not in any of their parts, yet one encounters them. But are they not rather games of architecture? Models of houses that are reluctant to be realized from the front? "For me they are also catchment areas," remarks Schulze. Area does not mean house, but it can mean a more abstract variant of dwelling. The move-in can be carried out by imaginary inhabitants. The thought comes to mind when you look at the one or other gate at the foot of the sculptures. A Minimal Art world for the mouse Jerry?
Here at the foot, the sculpture already makes a decision. A closed gate leads to the potential catchment area. Other works show a smaller hollow space. "Feet" for Schulze. In this case, there is no move-in here, but a counterpart. The conclusion of a sculpture towards the floor is an essential moment that makes the work. Not only for a counterpart, but also for an object or architecture, the end, the base, the foundation, is a decisive component for the perception of the complete contour and the assertion in space.

At first it looks as if Schulze's sculptures were created spontaneously and quickly. In reality, she likes to take her time, observing and rethinking spontaneity very carefully. The waiting is just as important a work process as the laying on of hands. Because only if you lie in wait in the woods long enough do you have the chance to perceive the emergence of phenomena. When Schulze lies in wait in front of her sculptures, it is not to force their form, but to recognize what the object contains and how it reacts with its surroundings or other objects. A lot happens while waiting. Important insights arise from this, which are then worked out again in more active processes.
Her works should not look beautiful. The implementation of 'good ideas' is not her concern, which is why Schulze does not fabricate plans. Good ideas are platforms through which someone can present themselves in a particularly advantageous way. This is not her approach. She also turns away from "good taste". The 'bad perfection' shares archaic moments of the open work of art. Instead of a refined finalization, the sculptures retain a character of processuality and authentic momentary realism."

excerpt from a text by Larissa Kikol

Ulrike Schulze *1985, lives and works in Cologne. She is the recipient of the Friedrich-Vordemberge-Stipend of the City of Cologne and the first Ehrenhof Award of Stiftung Kunstpalast in Düsseldorf. Institutional solo-shows include artothek, Cologne; Parkhaus im Malkastenpark, Düsseldorf and Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf.