daily recommended exhibitions

posted 05. Feb 2023

Gego - Measuring Infinity

19. Sep 202205. Feb 2023
Gego: Measuring Infinity October 19, 2022–February 5, 2023 Gallery 2 This international survey of the work of Gertrud Goldschmidt, known as Gego (Hamburg, 1912 – Caracas, 1994)—one of the most important postwar artists in Latin America—charts her interdisciplinary artistic production through different yet interrelated fields: architecture, design, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, fabric, site-specific installations, spatial interventions, public art and pedagogy. Arranged chronologically, the exhibition includes over 120 works in a variety of media from the early 1950s to the early 1990s, encompassing every period in the artist’s production. Gego: Measuring Infinity is organized by Museo Jumex, Mexico City; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand—MASP. The exhibition was developed by Julieta González, Artistic Director, Instituto Inhotim, Brumadinho, Brazil; Geaninne Gutiérrez-Guimarães, Associate Curator, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, and Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, New York; Pablo León de la Barra, Curator at Large, Latin America, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, New York, and former Adjunct Curator of Latin American Art, Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand—MASP; in collaboration with Tanya Barson, former Chief Curator, Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona; and Michael Wellen, Senior Curator, International Art, Tate Modern, London. Coordinated at Museo Jumex by Cindy Peña, Curatorial Assistant.

artist

Gego 
Museo Jumex, Mexico City

Museo Jumex, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra 303
11520 Mexico City

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posted 04. Feb 2023

Reuben Paterson - Guide Kaiārahi

10. Jul 202131. Dec 2024
10 Jul 2021 — 31 Dec 2024 **Reuben Paterson Guide Kaiārahi ** Reuben Paterson’s much-anticipated major new sculpture Guide Kaiārahi, 2021, a 10-metre-high waka (canoe) made of 595 iridescent crystals, was revealed at Auckland Art Gallery on July 8, 2021. Commissioned by Auckland Art Gallery and Edmiston Trust, Aotearoa New Zealand artist Reuben Paterson (Ngāti Rangitihi, Ngāi Tūhoe, Tūhourangi) says Guide Kaiārahi navigates a spectacular journey from Papatūānuku (the earth mother) into the embrace of Ranginui (the sky father). “As the crystals illuminate the Gallery in rainbow refractions, the waka appears to venture skyward, seemingly levitating above the forecourt pool,” he says. The inspiration for the crystalline sculpture is the legend of the sighting of a “phantom waka” on Lake Tarawera 11 days before the devastating eruption of Mt Tarawera in 1886 which resulted in the loss of life and displacement, and destroyed New Zealand’s iconic Pink and White Terraces. “In the early hours of June 10, 1886, our ancestral mountains Wāhanga, Ruawāhia and Tarawera split apart, spewing forth millions of tonnes of ash and debris. By floating Guide Kaiārahi above the Gallery’s pool, he appears magical—an apparition that floats in the sky while having a narrative linked closely to our own history. He guides us as an escort into unknown or unmapped territories, in much same way as the waka of our migration journeys to Aotearoa,” Paterson says. Hovering above Auckland Art Gallery’s forecourt pool like a compass needle in vertical orientation or a rocket, the waka sculpture suggests navigation to worlds beyond our own. It also refers to early navigators’ use of stars to traverse the vast Pacific Ocean to Aotearoa. Combining references to natural and supernatural realms, the sculpture draws upon Māori cosmology and creation narratives. It also has as a personal resonance for Paterson as his Ngāti Rangithi kaumātua describe their iwi, who descend from the Te Arawa waka of the Bay of Plenty, as “Te Heketanga-a-rangi,” those who descend from the celestial heavens, in reference to their tūpuna, Ohomairangi. Commissioned by Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Guide Kaiārahi is owned and generously supported by the Edmiston Trust.
Auckland Art Gallery, Auckland

TOI O TAMAKI | Corner Kitchener and Wellesley Streets
Auckland

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posted 03. Feb 2023

Pia Fries

03. Feb 202309. Jul 2023
03.02.2023  — 09.07.2023 Pia Fries Unbestritten gehört Pia Fries seit den 1990er-Jahren international zu den wichtigen Positionen innerhalb der Malerei. Geboren 1955 in Beromünster, CH, zog sie in den 1980er-Jahren nach Düsseldorf, um an der dortigen Kunstakademie bei Gerhard Richter zu studieren, deren Meisterschülerin sie wurde. Sie entwickelte ihr eigenes, unverkennbares Werk, das über die Materialität des Gemalten die Möglichkeiten von Malerei und Raum erkundet. Für den von ihr entwickelten neuen, freien und zugleich offenen Malereibegriff wurde Pia Fries sowohl mit zahlreichen Preisen ausgezeichnet und zu renommierten Ausstellungen wie etwa die Biennale in Venedig eingeladen als auch auf mehrere Professuren berufen. Die Ausstellung im Kunsthaus Baselland zeigt neben Arbeiten ab den 1990er-Jahren erstmals in der Schweiz ihre aktuellsten Werke, mit denen Pia Fries einen neuen künstlerischen Schritt geht. Ein Katalog begleitend zur Ausstellung ist in Planung. KuratorIn: Ines Goldbach

artist

Pia Fries 

curator

Ines Goldbach 
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posted 02. Feb 2023

Hans HARTUNG. Revenge

12. Jan 202318. Feb 2023
New York, 130 Orchard Street 12.01.2023 - 18.02.2023 **Hans HARTUNG Revenge**

artist

Hans Hartung 
PERROTIN NEW YORK

PERROTIN | 130 Orchard Street
NY 10002 New York

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posted 01. Feb 2023

Isaac Julien: Lina Bo Bardi—A Marvellous Entanglement

28. Jan 202329. May 2023
28.01.2023 - 29.05.2023 **Isaac Julien: Lina Bo Bardi—A Marvellous Entanglement** Across nine screens, Isaac Julien’s Lina Bo Bardi—A Marvellous Entanglement (2019) explores the life, work, and legacy of the Italian-Brazilian modernist architect Lina Bo Bardi (1914–1992). Born in Rome, Italy, and relocating to São Paulo, Brazil in the 1940s, Bo Bardi was a multifaceted artist and thinker who developed an architectural practice rooted in the social potential of space and the fusion of Italian and Brazilian culture and aesthetics. Emphasizing improvisation, recycling existing spaces, and utilizing novel building materials, Bo Bardi designed some of Brazil’s most iconic art and cultural institutions, including the São Paulo Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art of Bahia, SESC Pompéia, and the Teatro Oficina. In a new arrangement imagined by Julien specifically for this presentation, A Marvellous Entanglement establishes a vital architectural dialogue between Bo Bardi’s visionary buildings and the Williams Forum, the central space of Frank Gehry’s expansion project. Through a carefully constructed choreography of sound and moving images, Julien combines six years of archival research, on-location footage shot across multiple Bo Bardi-designed buildings, voice and dance performances, and recitations of Bo Bardi’s writings by two actresses. Quoting Bo Bardi in his title, Julien invokes her spirit and points to the liberatory possibilities of non-linear histories within global circulations of art and culture. This exhibition is organized in conjunction with multiple cultural partners across Philadelphia including the Barnes Foundation; BlackStar Projects; Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania; and The Fabric Workshop and Museum, on the occasion of the Barnes Foundation’s centennial and newly commissioned film installation, Once Again…(Statues Never Die) on view June 19–September 4, 2022.

artist

Isaac Julien 
Philadelphia Museum of Art

26th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
PA-19130 Philadelphia

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posted 31. Jan 2023

Vincent Meessen. After / D’après / Na

18. Nov 202226. Mar 2023
opening: 17. Nov 2022 07:00 pm
18.11.2022 - 26.03.2023 Opening: 17.11.2022, 7–11pm **Vincent Meessen After / D’après / Na** CIVA is pleased to present Vincent Meessen’s exhibition After / D’après / Na, the inaugural project of Research in Residence, a collection-based transdisciplinary research initiative for architects, artists, landscape designers, academics, and critics. Research in Residence renegotiates the terrain between the often hermetic sphere of archives and their public exposure. The program supports innovative research through various forms: exhibitions, installations, podcasts, talks, essays, performances, and more. Intellectual exchange that emerges from long-term dialogue is at the heart of this pilot project, which intends to go beyond a mono-historical perspective in favor of nonlinear interpretations of CIVA’s collection. Research in Residence is a platform for projects that challenge current research norms and promote alternative modes of knowledge production and distribution. Artist Vincent Meessen inaugurates CIVA’s new research residency program. In his exhibition After / D'après / Na, architecture is integrated into an environment and its various cohabitants, human and nonhuman alike. The exhibition weaves together two types of architecture that characterize La Garenne, a rural plot on the outskirts of Brussels: the Art Nouveau cottage, exemplified by a demolished work by Léon Sneyers (whose archive is part of the CIVA collection), and the contemporary house, as articulated by OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen and their design on the same site. The exhibition, located at the crossroads of architecture, contemporary art, and ecology, will be accompanied by a program of events including a screening of Meessen’s early video works and a guided tour of the CIVA Collections by the artist. Vincent Meessen lives and works in Brussels. Meessen’s work has been presented at WIELS (Brussels, 2016), BOZAR (Brussels, 2017), Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris, 2018), the Power Plant (Toronto, 2019), and in numerous biennials including those in Venice (2015), Taipei (2016), Shanghai (2018), Chicago (2019), Lubumbashi (2019), São Paulo (2021), Dakar (2022), and Berlin (2022). Artistic Director: Nikolaus Hirsch / Curators: Francis Carpentier, Silvia Franceschini
CIVA Brussels

Rue de l’Ermitage 55
1050 Brussels

Belgiumshow map
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posted 30. Jan 2023

Rebecca Horn. Labyrinth of the Soul: Drawings 1965-2015

07. Jan 202318. Feb 2023
07.01.2023 - 18.02.2023 **Rebecca Horn. Labyrinth of the Soul: Drawings 1965-2015** Sean Kelly is delighted to announce Labyrinth of the Soul: Drawings 1965-2015, a major exhibition featuring fifty years of drawing by Rebecca Horn. This historical presentation, which includes rarely seen works on paper, will open in the New York gallery in January before traveling to Sean Kelly, Los Angeles in March, two cities in which Horn lived and for which she has a strong affinity. Horn’s first exhibition with the gallery in nine years, this significant survey will be the first opportunity for visitors to see many of these critically important works, most of which have never been shown in the United States. The occasion also marks the thirty-four-year professional relationship between Rebecca Horn and Sean Kelly. This extraordinary exhibition, which includes 55 works on paper, is the first dedicated exclusively to this aspect of Rebecca Horn’s practice, and the most extensive presentation of her work in the United States since her major retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 1993, curated by Germano Celant. From her earliest stages as an artist, drawing has been foundational and informed every aspect of Horn’s multi-faceted oeuvre, ranging from performances, which utilize bodily extensions, to feature films, poems, dynamic sculptures, and site-specific installations. Throughout her career, drawing has occupied a central role, with Horn working serially at different moments to create specific bodies of work, ranging from smaller, more intimate pieces to the later, large Bodylandscape works on paper. The earliest works in the exhibition, dating from the mid-1960s, evince Horn’s concern with the human form, bodily appendages, states of transformation, mechanization, and machinery, making evident her dedication to the aesthetic form of performance. In 1968, Horn was hospitalized for a debilitating lung condition brought on by certain sculptural materials she was using. A subsequent period of convalescence at a sanitorium inspired a series of sculptures concerned with the body, isolation, and physical vulnerability. These themes became the artist’s subject, and her proposals for sculptures are documented in these early drawings. Other works, from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, demonstrate the myriad approaches Horn has taken to the form, with each cycle of drawings having a distinct tempo, like the cadence of the poetry or rhythm of the music that have continuously inspired her. For her smaller drawings, Horn often worked simultaneously across multiple sheets of paper laid out before her, adding marks and details as she moved delicately and quickly, fluttering across the paper’s surface like a butterfly, touching down on each sheet at various intervals to make her marks. From around 2003-2015, Horn produced an impressive group of large-scale works referred to as Bodylandscape, paintings on paper that extended her interest in the body as machine into an autobiographical, performative arena. Incorporating pencil, acrylic, and watercolor and gouache with text, these energetic works are scaled to the artist’s own proportions, defined by the limit to which her arms could extend when building the sometimes-frenzied compositions through the movements and actions of her own body. Horn’s progression from attaching performative apparatus to her body in her early work, to creating mark producing automatons and sculptural machines, is synthesized in these stunning works, which replace the replicant machine with the body of the artist, bringing the arc of her career full circle. In 2015, Horn suffered a devastating stroke, which sadly left her unable to continue making drawings, resulting in these psychologically charged works being among the final and finest works on paper that she produced. Following the New York installation of Labyrinth of the Soul, the exhibition will travel to Sean Kelly, Los Angeles, marking a homecoming of sorts for the artist. Rebecca Horn lived in Los Angeles from 1972-73 and was active with a circle of artists including John Baldessari and Eric Orr, amongst others. This will be the most significant presentation of Horn’s work on the West Coast since her 1990 exhibition at MOCA, Los Angeles, entitled Driving through Buster’s Bedroom, which was curated by Elizabeth Smith. Labyrinth of the Soul will provide viewers newfound insight into the artist’s practice and offer intriguing discoveries regarding Horn’s formal and informal relationships with artists ranging from Joseph Beuys, Marcel Duchamp, Jean Tinguely, Méret Oppenheim, Willem deKooning, and Hans Bellmer, amongst others. Horn has been the subject of major solo exhibitions at venues around the world, including the Museum Tinguely, Basel; Centre Pompidou-Metz, France; Lehmbruck Museum, Duisburg, Germany; Tate Modern, London; the Multimedia Art Museum, Moscow; the National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA), New Delhi; the Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge; Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris; the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; MOCA, Los Angeles; the Neue National Galerie, Berlin; the Kunsthalle Wein; the Serpentine Gallery, London; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva; the Kunsthaus Zürich; and the Anthology Film Archives, New York, amongst others. She has been included in group exhibitions at institutions including LACMA, Los Angeles; MoMA P.S.1, Long Island City, New York; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; the Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, CA; Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, Germany; and MAMbo – Museo d’Arte Moderna di Bologna, Bologna, Italy amongst others. Horn’s work has been presented at this year’s 59th Venice Biennials, as well as the 47th and 42nd editions and at documenta 5 and documenta 9. Her work is included in public collections including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands; the Tate Gallery, London, United Kingdom; Van Abbenmuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; the Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art, Turin, Italy; the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France; and the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, Seville, Spain, to name a few. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including the 2017 Willhelm Lehmbruck Prize, Lehmbruck Museum; the 2016 Ordre pour le mérite des Arts et des Sciences, France; the Grande médaille des arts plastiques from the Académie d’architecture de Paris, 2011; the 2010 Premium Imperiale Prize, Japan, and the 1988 Carnegie Prize.

artist

Rebecca Horn 
Sean Kelly Gallery, New York

475 Tenth Avenue
NY 10018 New York

United States of Americashow map
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posted 29. Jan 2023

Rebecca Horn. Labyrinth of the Soul: Drawings 1965-2015

11. Mar 202322. Apr 2023
11.03.2023 - 22.04.2023 **Rebecca Horn. Labyrinth of the Soul: Drawings 1965-2015** Sean Kelly is delighted to announce Labyrinth of the Soul: Drawings 1965-2015, a major exhibition featuring fifty years of drawing by Rebecca Horn. This historical presentation, which includes rarely seen works on paper, will open in the New York gallery in January before traveling to Sean Kelly, Los Angeles in March, two cities in which Horn lived and for which she has a strong affinity. Horn’s first exhibition with the gallery in nine years, this significant survey will be the first opportunity for visitors to see many of these critically important works, most of which have never been shown in the United States. The occasion also marks the thirty-four-year professional relationship between Rebecca Horn and Sean Kelly. This extraordinary exhibition, which includes 55 works on paper, is the first dedicated exclusively to this aspect of Rebecca Horn’s practice, and the most extensive presentation of her work in the United States since her major retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 1993, curated by Germano Celant. From her earliest stages as an artist, drawing has been foundational and informed every aspect of Horn’s multi-faceted oeuvre, ranging from performances, which utilize bodily extensions, to feature films, poems, dynamic sculptures, and site-specific installations. Throughout her career, drawing has occupied a central role, with Horn working serially at different moments to create specific bodies of work, ranging from smaller, more intimate pieces to the later, large Bodylandscape works on paper. The earliest works in the exhibition, dating from the mid-1960s, evince Horn’s concern with the human form, bodily appendages, states of transformation, mechanization, and machinery, making evident her dedication to the aesthetic form of performance. In 1968, Horn was hospitalized for a debilitating lung condition brought on by certain sculptural materials she was using. A subsequent period of convalescence at a sanitorium inspired a series of sculptures concerned with the body, isolation, and physical vulnerability. These themes became the artist’s subject, and her proposals for sculptures are documented in these early drawings. Other works, from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, demonstrate the myriad approaches Horn has taken to the form, with each cycle of drawings having a distinct tempo, like the cadence of the poetry or rhythm of the music that have continuously inspired her. For her smaller drawings, Horn often worked simultaneously across multiple sheets of paper laid out before her, adding marks and details as she moved delicately and quickly, fluttering across the paper’s surface like a butterfly, touching down on each sheet at various intervals to make her marks. From around 2003-2015, Horn produced an impressive group of large-scale works referred to as Bodylandscape, paintings on paper that extended her interest in the body as machine into an autobiographical, performative arena. Incorporating pencil, acrylic, and watercolor and gouache with text, these energetic works are scaled to the artist’s own proportions, defined by the limit to which her arms could extend when building the sometimes-frenzied compositions through the movements and actions of her own body. Horn’s progression from attaching performative apparatus to her body in her early work, to creating mark producing automatons and sculptural machines, is synthesized in these stunning works, which replace the replicant machine with the body of the artist, bringing the arc of her career full circle. In 2015, Horn suffered a devastating stroke, which sadly left her unable to continue making drawings, resulting in these psychologically charged works being among the final and finest works on paper that she produced. Following the New York installation of Labyrinth of the Soul, the exhibition will travel to Sean Kelly, Los Angeles, marking a homecoming of sorts for the artist. Rebecca Horn lived in Los Angeles from 1972-73 and was active with a circle of artists including John Baldessari and Eric Orr, amongst others. This will be the most significant presentation of Horn’s work on the West Coast since her 1990 exhibition at MOCA, Los Angeles, entitled Driving through Buster’s Bedroom, which was curated by Elizabeth Smith. Labyrinth of the Soul will provide viewers newfound insight into the artist’s practice and offer intriguing discoveries regarding Horn’s formal and informal relationships with artists ranging from Joseph Beuys, Marcel Duchamp, Jean Tinguely, Méret Oppenheim, Willem deKooning, and Hans Bellmer, amongst others. Horn has been the subject of major solo exhibitions at venues around the world, including the Museum Tinguely, Basel; Centre Pompidou-Metz, France; Lehmbruck Museum, Duisburg, Germany; Tate Modern, London; the Multimedia Art Museum, Moscow; the National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA), New Delhi; the Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge; Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris; the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; MOCA, Los Angeles; the Neue National Galerie, Berlin; the Kunsthalle Wein; the Serpentine Gallery, London; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva; the Kunsthaus Zürich; and the Anthology Film Archives, New York, amongst others. She has been included in group exhibitions at institutions including LACMA, Los Angeles; MoMA P.S.1, Long Island City, New York; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; the Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, CA; Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, Germany; and MAMbo – Museo d’Arte Moderna di Bologna, Bologna, Italy amongst others. Horn’s work has been presented at this year’s 59th Venice Biennials, as well as the 47th and 42nd editions and at documenta 5 and documenta 9. Her work is included in public collections including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands; the Tate Gallery, London, United Kingdom; Van Abbenmuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; the Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art, Turin, Italy; the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France; and the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, Seville, Spain, to name a few. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including the 2017 Willhelm Lehmbruck Prize, Lehmbruck Museum; the 2016 Ordre pour le mérite des Arts et des Sciences, France; the Grande médaille des arts plastiques from the Académie d’architecture de Paris, 2011; the 2010 Premium Imperiale Prize, Japan, and the 1988 Carnegie Prize.

artist

Rebecca Horn 
Sean Kelly, Los Angeles

1357 N Highland Ave
CA 90028 Los Angeles

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posted 28. Jan 2023

screen time

01. Oct 202226. Mar 2023
01.10.2022 – 26.03.2023 Eröffnung: 01.10.2022, 15 Uhr **screen time** Die Welt und die Körper der anderen sind hinter eine Scheibe gerückt. Viele sprechen davon, dass die Pandemie der voranschreitenden Digitalisierung zusätzliche Geschwindigkeit gegeben hat. Auch haben wir bemerkt, wie wichtig uns das Bild unseres Gegenübers ist. Vielfältige computerbasierte Techniken sind selbstverständlicher Teil künstlerischen Arbeitens geworden, ob Handyfotografie, Animation oder QR-Codes und Augmented Reality. Die digitale Technologie ermöglicht mittlerweile die täuschend echt wirkende Rekonstruktion der realen Welt im virtuellen Raum. Künstler:innen loten die Grenzen dieser Techniken aus, stellen die Frage nach der Wirklichkeit der virtuellen Welten und reflektieren die immer engere Kooperation von Mensch und Maschine. Wie verändert sie unser Verhalten, unsere Wahrnehmung von Realität, unsere Vorstellungswelt? Für die Ausstellung »screen time – digitale Wirklichkeiten« wurde eine Auswahl von 18 künstlerischen Positionen getroffen, die sich mit Bildphänomenen vor und hinter dem Bildschirm auseinandersetzen. Kurator Marcel Schumacher hat ihre Werke zu einem Ausstellungsessay arrangiert, der einen Bogen schlägt von Stanislaw Lem durch den »Maschinenraum« bis in Räume, die zumindest gedanklich hinter der Bildschirmoberfläche liegen. Willkommen beim digitologischen Weltkongress! Künstlerinnen Banz & Bowinkel, Tim Berresheim, Louisa Clement, Catherina Cramer, Dan Dryer, Philipp Goldbach, Tim Gorinski, Manuel Graf, Alex Grein, Fabian Heitzhausen, Florian Kuhlmann, Lukas Marxt, Camilo Sandoval / Vered Koren, Ji hyung Song, Lucia Sotnikova, Lex Rütten & Jana Kerima Stolzer, Julia Weißenberg
Kunsthaus NRW Kornelimünster, Aachen

KUNSTHAUS NRW | Abteigarten 6
52076 Aachen

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posted 27. Jan 2023

MARINA ABRAMOVIĆ. Gates and Portals

24. Sep 202205. Mar 2023
Modern Art Oxford OXFORD, UK September 24, 2022 - March 5, 2023 Pitt Rivers Museum OXFORD UK September 24, 2022 - April 2, 2023 **MARINA ABRAMOVIĆ. Gates and Portals** “This is an attempt to do something different, because in a normal exhibition you’re just a silent witness. At Modern Art Oxford, rather than just viewing artworks in front of you, you will be partaking in an experience that will be happening to you.” – Marina Abramović Pioneering performance artist Marina Abramović (b. 1946, Belgrade, lives and works in New York) presents a new site-specific performance-based exhibition at Modern Art Oxford. Gates and Portals explores transitional states of being, with each visitor participating as a performer with a small group of others. During the exhibition visitors will encounter gates and portals that prompt contemplation of bodily awareness and elevated consciousness. The exhibition was developed following a research residency at the Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford in summer 2021. To complement Gates and Portals, a case installation of a film and new drawings made by the artist during her residency will be on display at the Pitt Rivers Museum.
Modern Art Oxford °

30 Pembroke Street
GB-0X1 1BP Oxford

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Irelandshow map
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posted 26. Jan 2023

Gerhard Richter. Overpainted Photographs

19. Jan 202317. Feb 2023
opening: 19. Jan 2023 06:00 pm
19.01.2023 - 17.02.2023 Opening Thursday, 19.01.2023, 6 — 8 pm **Gerhard Richter. Overpainted Photographs** With the exhibition Gerhard Richter | Overpainted Photographs, Sies + Höke presents 65 works dating from the years 1989 to 2018. The works represent a significant part of Richter's œuvre, embodying the interface between the representation of photographic image content and abstract painting. On the occasion of the opening Dieter Schwarz will host a speech. An accompanying catalogue is forthcoming, including an essay by Siri Hustvedt as well as new texts by Dietmar Elger and Mark Godfrey. Gerhard Richter’s history of using or referring to photographs in one way or another is long and complex, but whatever he does with an actual photo or the idea of a photo, it always feels reinvented. — Siri Hustvedt on Gerhard Richter in Truth and Rightness
Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf

Poststr. 2 / Poststr. 3
40213 Dusseldorf

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posted 25. Jan 2023

Living Pictures: Photography in Southeast Asia

02. Dec 202220. Aug 2023
02.12.2022 - 20.08.2023 **Living Pictures: Photography in Southeast Asia** National Gallery Singapore presents Living Pictures: Photography in Southeast Asia, the first-ever major survey of photography from the region. Despite its undeniable power to shape historical narratives and change perspectives, the medium has largely been left out of both photographic and art histories of the region. With over 300 photographs, Living Pictures seeks to draw out this history, framed by a pivotal question: what do photographs do? Living Pictures begins in the 1800s, with exoticising images of the region and its people captured by European photographers for European eyes. As cameras became more accessible, those once subject to its othering gaze seized the means to create images of themselves, resulting in a variety of studio portraits that hint at modes of self-fashioning and performance. These early photographs have shaped our understanding of Southeast Asia through the centuries. Photography has shared a contentious relationship with reality, most evidently in photographs created for documentary purposes. Compelling images from the Second Indochina War, including from former Associated Press photographer Nick Ut, Vietnamese photographer Võ An Khánh and late Singaporean photojournalist Terence Khoo, challenge notions of the neutrality of documentary photography and its functions as it circulates in the public domain. As the exhibition moves into the present, increasing awareness of its subjectivity brought photography into the artistic realm, which was also part of the larger global turn towards conceptualism and institutional critique. Artists such as Pramuan Burusphat and Nap Jamir II explored and experimented with new methods of image creation. Many turned the camera towards themselves as they contemplated the imaginative space of the image. Dinh Q. Lê’s Crossing the Farther Shore (2014), an immersive weaved structure comprising over 5,000 found photographs from pre-1975 South Vietnam, interweaves personal histories with controversial historical narratives, exploring the tensions between them and the role of photography in memory. Memory and imagination similarly feature in Heman Chong’s God Bless Diana (2004), a shop consisting of postcards of generic images of urban life, each sold to visitors for $1. Chong’s work tests the passive, static nature of the gallery space by encouraging active circulation of his images. Such proliferation of images draws closer to the digital age: digital spaces for circulation and consumption have elevated photography into the dominant visual medium of this generation, and social media, predominantly image-based, continues to shape the way we view the world and engage with each other. Living Pictures ventures into this online world with four notable photographers— Nguan, Shwe Wutt Hmon, Veejay Villafranca and Agan Harahap—presenting a selection of their works on National Gallery Singapore’s Instagram page. Living Pictures: Photography in Southeast Asia is accompanied by an exhibition catalogue with full-colour plates of works from the exhibition and contributions from curators Charmaine Toh, Goh Sze Ying, Roger Nelson, Roy Ng and Kenneth Tay, as well as pre-eminent scholars Alexander Supartono, Daniel Palmer and Kevin Chua.
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posted 24. Jan 2023

Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley & Josèfa Ntjam

02. Dec 202209. Apr 2023
02.12.2022 - 09.04.2023 **Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley & Josèfa Ntjam** The worlds of artists Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley and Josèfa Ntjam collide in a free immersive exhibition. For our winter season, the worlds of artists Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley and Josèfa Ntjam collide in a free immersive exhibition. Working across archives, maps and video games, the artists consider how acts of resistance, rebuilding and reimagining can lead to transformative new worlds. Josèfa Ntjam When The Moon Dreamed of the Ocean 2022 Installation view at FACT Liverpool Photo by Rob Battersby Josèfa’s work reexamines history in the aftermath of colonialism and the Transatlantic slave trade. Her richly layered works reference counter-cultural movements and non-Western histories that symbolise ideas of resistance, transformation and freedom. Josèfa presents these symbols within an interstellar, underground cave filled with jellyfish, plankton and mushrooms. These natural life forms survive by communicating through networks and signals that they create amongst themselves. By drawing parallels between our human behaviour and natural processes, she demonstrates how spaces of solidarity, care and revolution can thrive in darkness. Danielle opens access to new worlds designed with The Bandidos, a group of young people from Liverpool. When Danielle and the group first started working together, she asked: what doesn’t Liverpool have that you need? What does your world need? And, if you had everything you needed to live, what would you want? Danielle creates artworks that archive the experiences of Black Trans people and communities who can be otherwise underserved. Here, she brings to life The Bandidos' imaginative visions, developing a video game that can be explored online and through four portals inside the gallery. Both Danielle and Josèfa’s worlds play with time to shift our view on how the past impacts our present. If conflicting versions of history can exist, so can alternative possibilities for our future. Through their careful observations of archives and understanding of needs, they show us how acts of resistance, rebuilding and reimagining can lead to transformative new worlds. This exhibition will be the final instalment of Radical Ancestry, FACT’s year-long exploration into the sense of belonging. This programme of exhibitions, projects, residencies and events look at how history, geography, biology and culture shape our ancestral history and question how technology can help us to explore new ways of thinking and experimenting with who we are.

artists & participants

Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley,  Josefa Ntjam 
FACT Liverpool

FACT | 88 Wood Street
L1 4DQ Liverpool

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posted 23. Jan 2023

Thilo HEINZMANN

06. Jan 202304. Mar 2023
06.01.2023 - 04.03.2023 **Thilo HEINZMANN** solo show
PERROTIN SHANGHAI

3/F, 27 Hu Qiu Road, Huangpu District
Shanghai

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posted 22. Jan 2023

Christoph Girardet – “A Theory of Ghosts"

10. Dec 202212. Feb 2023
10.12.2022 - 12.02.2023 **Christoph Girardet – “A Theory of Ghosts”** Nordhorn. Vom 10. Dezember 2022 bis zum 12. Februar 2023 zeigt die Städtische Galerie Nordhorn eine Einzelausstellung mit dem Videokünstler und Filmemacher Christoph Girardet (*1966). Für seine Filme, Installationen und fotografischen Arbeiten verwendet er ausschließlich bestehendes Material zumeist aus Kinofilmen, vorwiegend der 1950er und 1960er Jahre, die häufig bereits vergessen sind. Den aufwändig recherchierten Motivsammlungen oder zufällig gefundenen Bildern begegnet Girardet mit einer zentralen Kulturtechnik der filmischen Gestaltung. Mit den Mitteln der Montage gelingt es ihm, die Strukturen und die Ästhetik filmischer Bilder freizulegen, gleichzeitig schafft er neue emotional aufgeladene Werke jenseits von auserzählten Plots und Geschichten. Für die Städtische Galerie Nordhorn hat Christoph Girardet eine Werkauswahl unter dem Titel „A Theory of Ghosts“ zusammengestellt. Unter anderem wird erstmals Girardets neue Arbeit „Jishin“ (japanisch: Erdbeben) von 2022 zu sehen sein. In fünf aufeinanderfolgenden, leicht variierten Kameraperspektiven wiederholt sich ein archaisch anmutender, dramatischer Spezialeffekt für einen Hollywoodfilm der 1940er Jahre: Ein Haus beginnt zu schwanken, Steinlaternen fallen um, ein Akteur verliert den Halt, und am Ende füllen Berge von Trümmern die Leinwand. Die neue Montage des noch ungeschnittenen Rohmaterials ermöglicht einen analytischen Blick auf die klischierte und kulissenhafte Szenerie: Ursache der Katastrophe ist nicht ein Naturereignis, sondern eine wohlkalkulierte Performance. Girardet schlägt Brücken zwischen Genres und Gattungen, zwischen Hochkultur und Unterhaltung, bildender Kunst und Kino oder zwischen fiktionalem und strukturellem Film. Seine einflussreichen und international ausgezeichneten Arbeiten sind sowohl Reflexionen als auch ganz subjektive Interpretationen einer vielgestaltigen vorgefundenen medialen Wirklichkeit. Zur Ausstellung wird eine Publikation erscheinen. Die Eröffnung findet am Freitag, 9. Dezember 2022, um 19 Uhr statt.
Städtische Galerie Nordhorn

STÄDTISCHE GALERIE NORDHORN | Alte Weberei, Vechteaue 2
48529 Nordhorn

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posted 21. Jan 2023

Black Place. Jutta Koether

28. Oct 202216. Apr 2023
28.10.2022 - 16.04.2023 **Black Place. Jutta Koether ** Black Place is Jutta Koether’s first monographic exhibition in Spain, bringing together works spanning more than three decades of her production.   Ever since the early 1980s, Jutta Koether (Cologne, 1958) has been developing an artistic practice grounded in painting and intersected by writing, performance and music, practices that serve to make her undisciplined when it comes to art historiography and seeking her own genealogies. Koether’s work approaches the history of painting in a stealthy, disobedient manner, reclaiming the medium as place for an artistic practice that is informed by feminism. Black Place brings together works in a variety of formats and materialities, from large-scale canvases in which the artist reappropriates works by artists such as Botticelli orRubens – made on the ground in a manner almost akin to performance in places where they were initially exhibited with a sense of immediacy in their making – to medium and small format works on various formats in which Koether often applies other materials, thereby exceeding the limits of traditional painting, influenced by DIY and punk. Although Koether’s work has always featured the history of painting as a subject, her strategies of appropriation have varied, as has the way in which text is introduced into her work. Her focus on various expressions of popular culture is obvious from her earliest works, as well as on other issues related to history and the very logic with which she constructs painting. Black Place is her first exhibition in Spain since 1987, when she jointly presented her work alongside Rosemarie Trockel and Bettina Semmer in an exhibition that was staged at La Máquina Española in Seville. She travelled to New York for the first time in that same year and has lived there ever since 1991, combining this with her time in Berlin and Hamburg, where she teaches at the Hochschule für Bildende Künste (HFBK). Jutta Koether was born in Cologne in 1958. She studied art and philosophy at the University of Cologne and also completed the Independent Study Program at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York in the early 1990s. Museums and institutions such as Museum Brandhorst in Munich, Mudam Luxembourg, PRAXES Centre for Contemporary Art in Berlin, Moderna Museet in Stockholm, Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, Kunsthalle in Bern, the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna and the Kölnischer Kunstverein in Cologne, among others, have dedicated monographic exhibitions to her work. In addition to her work as an artist, Koether has written for art and music publications such as Spex, Eau de Cologne, Artforum, Texte zur Kunst and Flash Art, and she is the author of several books, including f. (1987). Koether has also collaborated on various projects with the Reena Spaulings collective and with Rita Ackerman, Tony Conrad, Kim Gordon, John Miller, Steven Parrino and Tom Verlaine, among others, in her musical performances. She has been Professor of Painting and Drawing at the University of Fine Arts Hamburg since 2010. Curators: Beatriz Herráez and Catalina Lozano

artist

Jutta Koether 
ARTIUM MUSEOA, Vitoria-Gasteiz °

ARTIUM de Alava | C/ Francia, 24
01002 Vitoria-Gasteiz

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posted 20. Jan 2023

Morehshin Allahyari : Zoba’ah: The Whirlwind

28. Oct 202231. Jan 2023
28.10.2022 - 31.01.2023 **Morehshin Allahyari : Zoba’ah: The Whirlwind** Zoba’ah: The Whirlwind—a digital exhibition by Morehshin Allahyari. How can we participate in creating the world we want to see and live in? To download artist Morehshin Allahyari’s sculpture Zoba’ah: The Whirlwind you have to agree to a set of “terms and conditions” written by the artist and answer how you will take small actions to change the world in the bigger picture. In this way, you summon Zoba’ah, a creature from the Islamic world, who always brings about sudden change. To download you hereby agree, represent, and warrant that: You are here and you recognize your privileges (if any) have shaped your life experiences. Privilege is defined as “a special right, advantage, or immunity granted or available only or preferably to a particular person or group.“ You are here and you recognize that race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexual preference determine our access to opportunities and resources. You are here because you recognize the inequalities and uneven realities of our world. You are here because you want to be more responsible, more aware, and kinder than your ancestors. You are here and you recognize the long ongoing history of Western colonization and white supremacy. You are here because you too believe that colonialism, racism, capitalism, sexism, and environmental crisis are some of the most troubling and ongoing issues of our contemporary world. You are here and you recognize the need for change. You are here and you will be an ally. You are here because you believe even small acts of resistance can make a difference. You are here and you believe the same troubles that shape our world today will shape our world in the future; if unchanged. You are here because you believe we need to do better. You are here because you want to make space. You are here because you want to participate in re-imagining another timeline. You are here because you want to participate in re-imagining another space. You are here because you want to participate in re-imagining another future for us all. Based on drawings of the jinn Zoba’ah from the 14th and 16th centuries, the Iranian-born artist Morehshin Allahyari has 3D modeled the sculpture Zoba’ah: The Whirlwind for the Museum of Contemporary Art’s virtual collection. In pre-Islamic and Islamic theology, a jinn is an intelligent spirit known as a shape-shifter created from smokeless fire, who exists in a parallel world. As one of the most powerful jinn, Zoba’ah, which translates as “whirlwind,” brings immediate change once summoned. Meaningful change is needed, Allahyari believes, in this time of fights for justice, wars, and urgent climate disasters. Therefore, she brings Zoba’ah into virtual space, which has represented a crucial public arena in recent years for transformative movements such as the current Iranian Uprising led by women under the hashtag #MahsaAmini, Arab Spring, anti-imperialist movements in Hong Kong, the EndSARS uprising in Nigeria, the worldwide Black Lives Matter protests, and the Me Too movement. The Museum of Contemporary Art (est. 1991 in Roskilde) collects, researches, and exhibits ephemeral and time-based artworks. To better host these formats and engage new audiences, the museum became an itinerant museum in 2021.
Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART | Bagtæppet 10
DK-4000 Roskilde

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posted 19. Jan 2023

David Novros – Paintings

30. Sep 202228. Jan 2023
September 30–December 18, 2022, extended through January 28, 2023 at 101 Spring Street in New York. **David Novros – Paintings** Judd Foundation is pleased to present David Novros – Paintings on the ground floor of 101 Spring Street. The two works in the exhibition, Boathouse (2016) and Untitled (Graham Studio Mural II) (2006), are large, polychromatic paintings, described by the artist as portable murals. These works relate to imagery that Novros first explored in a fresco he made for the second floor of 101 Spring Street in 1970 and are examples of his ongoing commitment to what he calls “painting-in-place.” Untitled (Graham Studio Mural II) was one of five works Novros made for the sculptor Robert Graham’s home and studio in Venice, California, and is one of two that are extant. Boathouse, a multipartite painting in oil and murano, was made after a related mural cycle conceived for a boathouse in Middleburgh, New York was destroyed. These works demonstrate Novros’s ongoing interest in structural wholeness, the interplay of color, and place. This exhibition presents new opportunities for considering Novros’s portable murals within the context of his permanent fresco at 101 Spring Street, and for seeing anew the importance of place and permanence to his work more broadly. Jörg Daur, Deputy Director of the Museum Wiesbaden, describes Novros’s paintings as “distinguished by an interplay with each place that fundamentally allows this place as such to emerge.”1 In 1970, two years after Donald Judd purchased 101 Spring Street, he asked Novros to create a work for the second floor. Judd and Novros shared an interest in permanence, and for the relation between a work of art and the architecture in which it is exhibited or for which it was made. As Novros recalls, “Judd was using that space as his laboratory to center on the belief that the placement of a work of art was critical to its understanding. He was thinking of the various paintings and sculptures of the building as a ‘permanent installation.’ It worked out well for both of us, because it suits my concept of how a work of art could exist in an architectural space.”2 This work, restored by Judd Foundation in collaboration with the artist in 2013, was Novros’s first true fresco. In conjunction with the exhibition, Judd Foundation will host a reading by poet and translator Bill Porter (Red Pine) on Thursday, October 13, and a conversation between David Novros, Flavin Judd, Artistic Director of Judd Foundation, and Dr. Matt L. Levy, Associate Professor of Art History, Music, Theatre, and Visual Arts program at Penn State Behrend, on Thursday, November 10. Both events will be held at 101 Spring Street. 1 Jörg Daur, “Wall as painting – painting as wall,” in David Novros, (Wiesbaden, Germany: Museum Wiesbaden, 2014), 65. 2 Phong Bui and David Novros, “In Conversation: David Novros with Phong Bui,” The Brooklyn Rail, June 2008, https://brooklynrail.org/ 2008/06/art/chuck-close-with-phong-bui-june-08. About David Novros David Novros (b. 1941, Los Angeles, CA) is known for both his large, abstract paintings on irregularly shaped, multipartite canvases and also site-specific works that push beyond internal pictorial space to engage the surrounding architectural context. His work was first exhibited in a two-person show with Mark di Suvero in 1965 at the Park Place Gallery, and was included in the hugely influential Systemic Painting at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York in 1966. His work has been exhibited in prominent venues, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art; the Dallas Museum of Fine Art; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Novros’s works are owned by international institutions, with significant collections held at the Museum Wiesbaden, Germany, and the Menil Collection, Houston. In 2021, Novros’s immersive installation of painted rooms created for the 1975 exhibition Marden, Novros, Rothko: Painting in the Age of Actuality was reinstalled for the first time at the Moody Center for the Arts at Rice University, Houston, TX. Novros lives and works in New York City.

artist

David Novros 
Judd Foundation, New York

101 Spring Street
New York

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posted 18. Jan 2023

Mona Hatoum - all of a quiver

18. Sep 202214. May 2023
Kesselhaus 18. September 2022 – 14. Mai 2023 Eröffnung: 17. September, 18 – 21 Uhr **Mona Hatoum - all of a quiver** Mona Hatoum entwickelte eine raumgreifende, kinetische, ortsspezifische Installation, die sich die überragende Höhe des historischen Kesselhauses zunutze macht. Die Arbeit besteht aus einer hohen, gerasterten Struktur, die an das Gerüst eines im Bau oder Rückbau befindlichen Gebäudes erinnert. Hatoums Arbeit verweist auf die Umwälzungen der Gegenwart und auf unsere prekäre und fragile Existenz – sie bezeugt den Zusammenbruch vorherrschender Systeme und Versuche der Erneuerung und Rekonstruktion. Kuratorin: Kathrin Becker Ein Kooperationsprojekt des Neuen Berliner Kunstvereins, des KINDL – Zentrum für zeitgenössische Kunst und des Georg Kolbe Museum Kuratorinnen: Marius Babias, Kathrin Becker, Julia Wallner

artist

Mona Hatoum 
KINDL – Zentrum für zeitgenössische Kunst, Berlin

KINDL – ZENTRUM FÜR ZEITGENÖSSISCHE KUNST | Am Sudhaus 2
12053 Berlin

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posted 17. Jan 2023

Marwa Arsanios - Reverse Shot

12. Oct 202222. Jan 2023
Marwa Arsanios Reverse Shot October 12, 2022–January 22, 2023 The Mosaic Rooms presents the first public London solo exhibition by Marwa Arsanios surveying her interdisciplinary practice. The exhibition reflects on colonial and ecological violence, and the impacts of urbanism and capitalism. Arsanios’ expansive projects seek alternative ways to collectively resist and reclaim knowledge, and to practice a more harmonious relationship with the land. The exhibition opens with a presentation of the artists reading room. Visitors are invited to sit in the reading room and engage with texts together, as part of the artists longstanding interest in language, politics, and collaborative processes. Here, Arsanios has curated a selection of books to initiate discussion on alternative visions to mainstream patriarchal ideologies relating to ecology, politics, anarchist and feminist thought. Visitors and programme collaborators are also being invited to leave texts to share throughout the exhibition and the reading room will be activated through different programmed reading sessions. In the main room the works reflect on the systems of capitalism, and the lasting effects of the neo-liberal boom on both environmental and socio-political factors. Falling is not collapsing, falling is extending, draws on two instances to critically reflect on the effects of rapid capitalisation and urbanisation in Beirut since the 1990s. Arsanios reflects on the real estate drive and reconstruction of Beirut’s city centre following the civil war. In parallel the film looks at the rubbish crisis of 2015, where thousands of tons of garbage filled the streets. The work also consists of Resilient Weeds, a botanic archive of drawings of plants and animals that can survive the toxic levels of these sites. The large textile work on display came out of collaboration during the Who is Afraid of Ideology series of films with the women of the village of Jinwar in Northern Syria. The design by the artist was an attempt at translating the vision of the village described by the women themselves. Embroidery, a local skill, was used by Manal Mohammad, Khansa Nouh, and Maha Jermani from Sama organisation to turn the design into a tapestry. In another video installation, the film Amateurs, Stars and Extras or Labor of Loveuses the blur between stage and backstage to reflect on the labour of underpaid or unpaid domestic workers. Mainly performed by women who are often the fundamental actors in domestic economy, the film looks at the invisible work of care as experienced by domestic workers in different sites and geographies. Shifting between TV sets, behind the scenes, castings and acting, the film interrogates the role of extras in film as silent actors in relation to underpaid domestic work. It highlights the radical potential of collective political projects to affect change through the voices of syndicalists from the domestic workers’ syndicate in Mexico City. The exhibition concludes with the fourth chapter of Who is Afraid of Ideology? series Reverse Shot. The film departs from a collaborative project that is attempting to shift the status of a private land in the North of Lebanon to a common or a social waqf. The aim being to advance the right of usership over ownership. The land would only be used by people who do not own a land for agricultural purposes. The film follows this process and adds to it a reflection on the way land as a living object inherently resists property. The connections between the geological, historical, legal and agricultural invites an opportunity to imagine renewed connections with the earth. As part of the exhibition, a selection of posters by the artist will also be installed off site in public locations throughout London from October 10 until October 23, 2022. The public programme accompanying the exhibition features artists, activists, and scholars whose work and research explores how to organise with and from land as a focal point. Full programme can be found on mosaicrooms.org.
The Mosaic Rooms, London

226 Cromwell Road
SW5 0SW London

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